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Voter Thoughts On Missouri 08/05/14 Ballot Questions

From Missouri Voter Jason:

Here are my thoughts about the proposed constitutional amendments.

#1. “Right to Farm.”  The language is so broad that it is, to me, meaningless.  There are statutes on the books (Section 537.295 of the Missouri Revised Statutes) that address the issue of “nuisance suits” that seem to be the core argument in favor of the amendment.  I’m leaning against the amendment, but am open to argument in favor.

#5 “Unalienable Right to Keep and Bear Arms.”  While I think the language of this amendment has been poorly drafted, it aims to solidify the right to keep and bear arms and removes an impediment to concealed carry. I favor the amendment.

#7 “Increase Sales and Use Tax for Transportation.” I am opposed to this tax increase.  I’m taxed enough already.  More philosophically, I question whether sales tax should be used for transportation expenditures.  I generally prefer charging service users, and a fuel or tire or other ratable tax more directly associates the funding source with the expenditure purpose. (The advent of hybrid and electric vehicles, however, foils the purpose of the gasoline tax in making road users pay for roads; so, another (fair) way of apportioning the cost of roads to users needs to be developed.)  If more money is needed for roads (and I must be persuaded of the need), then a roads-related tax needs to be proposed.  I am opposed to using road-related funds for mass transit projects, aviation, ports, and the other transporation systems that would be funded by the proposed sales and use tax amendment. Again, philosophically, I would generate funding for these type projects from the users of those modes of transporation.

#8. “Veterans Lottery Ticket.”  I am opposed to the state operating a lottery, so the specification of a particular kind of lottery ticket to fund the state veterans homes, etc., is not something I support.  I believe these expenditures should be covered by everyone in the state (which means sales and/or income tax sources), not just those who gamble.

#9. “Security of Electronic Communications and Data.”  I support the amendment to include “electronic communications and data” in the list of protections against unreasonable search or seizure.  This amendment, incidentally, is consistent with the recent US Supreme Court ruling (Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie) that held a warrant was required before a cell phone could be searched by the authorities.  This ruling essentially extends Fourth Amendment (US Constitution) protections to at least some forms of electronic communications and data.  Amending the Missouri constitution to explicitly include electronic communications and data brings the state constitution into the modern world where we have not only papers and effects that are safe from warrantless search, but electronic information as well.

 

Missouri-Capitol[1]

 
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Posted by on July 9, 2014 in Amendments, Election, Freedom

 

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The Boeing Bribe

According to Wikipedia, “a tax credit is a sum deducted from the total amount a taxpayer owes to the state. A tax credit may be granted for various types of taxes, such as an income tax, property tax, or VAT. It may be granted in recognition of taxes already paid, as a subsidy, or to encourage investment or other behaviors.”

With the enactment of SB1 in Missouri, when Boeing shows a profit and there are $150,000,000 in taxes due for 2014, then Boeing will pay NO taxes.  I repeat; Boeing will pay no taxes.  However, if McDonald’s shows a profit and there are $150,000,000 in taxes due, then McDonald’s will pay $150,000,000 in taxes.

When a corporation shows a profit, a portion of that profit is collected in taxes and is the property of Missouri’s citizens. Boeing is being handed $150,000,000 of Missourians’ tax dollars.  How is this not corporate welfare?

This is the epitome of picking winners and losers
This is 100% anti-free-market
This is 100% anti-capitalism
This is 100% crony-capitalism.
This is 100% corporate welfare… ..giving property of Missouri taxpayers to a specific corporation.

So, the legislators that approved SB1 voted for picking winners and losers, anti-free-market, anti-capitalism and crony-capitalism legislation.  Is this why you sent them to Jefferson City?

But, what’s worse is that our Governor and General Assembly spent nearly $100,000 proving that they have created an anti-business climate in Missouri.  That’s the real travesty of this Special Session; Missouri is so anti-business, they have to bribe companies to come here.

Stunningly disappointed.

h/t wsj.com

It’s only a 3-page bill, so take the time to read it.  The reasons for the emergency clause seem to be completely at odds with reality.  Add a couple of clauses related to affirmative action and everyone… …but the taxpayer… …is happy.

 
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Posted by on December 9, 2013 in Capitalism, Free Market, Republican

 

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Cape County Tea Party – 8th CD Candidate Forum

In lieu of Cape County Tea Party’s regularly scheduled Third Tuesday Tea Time, the group organized and executed a 8th Congressional District Special Election Candidate Forum.  The six candidates for the office vacated by Jo Ann Emerson took part in the forum held on Wednesday May 22, 2013 at 6:30pm at the Cape Public Library in Cape Girardeau, MO.

The candidates are:

  • Bill Slantz (L)
  • Doug Enyart (C)
  • Jason Smith (R)
  • Dr. Robert George (I)
  • Steve Hodges (D)
  • Tom Brown (I)

The normal monthly Cape County Tea Party meeting held on Tuesday 5/21/13 was canceled.

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Video:

Below are the videos from the event:

 

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Missouri Senate Bill 375 And House Bill 773

From Laura Hausladen:

I am sending you this email to ask you to help with the effort to pass the “Making paper ballots the official ballot in MO” bills.  These are companion bills–the Senate one is SB 375, the House’s is HB 773.

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What the Bills Will Do:

  1. End the use of the touch screen voting machines (called DREs) for all but the handicapped.  (No more DREs could be purchased and the old ones could only be used by the handicapped.  Ballot marking devices would replace them for use by all handicapped voters.  (These machines create paper ballots so that there is a physical ballot that can be used in recounts and audits.)
  2. Require that there be hand-counted publicly viewable audits of at least 5% of the ballots before the election is certified. (This is not much of a change from what is already required. However, it is extremely important because the opti-scan machines, which count the paper ballots in essentially every county in Missouri,  have also been proved to be hackable just by tampering with the memory cards that get inserted into them.)
  3. Ensure that the public has the ability to gain access to the election records and ballots after the election has been certified, without having to first fight and win a battle in court.

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Why We Need These Bills:

  1. A knowledgeable computer expert with access to JUST ONE of the DREs in St Louis (or one of the other counties throughout the state) could change the outcome of a statewide election.
  2. If the vote were tampered with in some way, it would be virtually impossible to prove that this had been done.
  3. Right now if a re-count is necessary, all of the votes cast on the DREs are not actually recounted, because there is nothing tangible to recount.  The program is just run again.  (Interestingly enough, when this was done in one MO recount, the re-run submitted a vote that was one vote off from the original count.  How do you explain that?!)
  4. Right now there are vendor programmers whose lines of code are not able to be viewed by any of our state’s county clerks or legislators or members of the computer programming literate public, and these ‘unknown’ programmers are responsible for how vast numbers of Missourian’s votes are cast and how virtually ALL of Missourian’s votes are counted.
  5. Computer viruses could change the results of elections and no one would even know that this had happened.
  6. Missouri’s Constitution provides for open elections.  Our elections are NOT open if the general public doesn’t have access to a process which they themselves can understand/verify the means by which their vote is recorded and counted.  Paper ballots and publicly viewable hand counts are the only way to achieve open elections in Missouri!

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What You Need to Do!  Steps 1 & 2 are ESSENTIAL and only take a couple minutes. 
(Don’t worry if you don’t have time to do more! But DO THIS!)

  1. Fill out witness form for SB 375 BELOW by clicking the link  and recording your name and address.  Add comments as simple or as thorough as you would like.  (Copy them before you submit so that you can use them on the next witness form, and in case your submission returns the phrase “database not selected”.  If this happens, just wait a bit and try again.)
  2. Fill out witness form for HB 773 BELOW by clicking the link.
  3. Forward this email or one of your own with the links to the witness forms and ask people to fill them out. The more there are the more likely this bill will get passed out of committee.
  4. Send email (preferable), or call the Senators (listed at the end of this email) to tell them you want them to support this bill.  (Or do both!)  They are the ones who must vote it out of committee so that it can get scheduled for a vote on the floor of the Senate.) REMEMBER, if you are one of their constituents, be sure to let them know!
  5. Send email (preferable),  or call these Representatives to tell them you want them to support this bill.  (Or do both!)
  6. Write Sen. Brian Nieves to thank him for sponsoring SB 375; write Rep. Sue Entlicher to thank her for sponsoring HB773 and hearing it in her committee; write Sen. Wasson to thank him for hearing it in his committee.
  7. Attend the hearings on Monday March 25th at 2:00 p.m. in the Senate Lounge for SB 375, and on Tuesday March 26th at 8:15 in Hearing room 5 for HB 773

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Witness form link for SB 375 — Paper Ballots <- If you do nothing else, do this

Witness form link for HB 773 — Paper Ballots <- But do this too!

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CONFERENCE CALL:

Feel free to join the Conference Call this evening with the non-partisan citizen group who are spearheading the push for this bill.  We will attempt to answer any and all questions.  We will also outline what we need to do to get this bill passed.
TONIGHT! Wed. March 20th at 8:30

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SENATE (FINANCIAL AND GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS) AND ELECTION COMMITTEE 

(click the link to go to their page and find their phone and email. Or just remember the formula.  First.Last@senate.mo.gov  For example: Brian.Nieves@senate.mo.gov  Tell them you want them to support this bill in every way possible.)

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HOUSE ELECTIONS COMMITTEE

(click the link to go to their page and find their phone and email. Or just remember the formula.  First.Last@house.mo.gov  Ex. Sue.Entlicher@house.mo.gov  Tell them you want them to support this bill in every way possible.)

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Thanks so much for working alongside us in this fight for open and fair elections in Missouri!
Laura Hausladen

P.S. If you want to spread the word through video messaging try these videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsB2UYsPPq0   (Specific to St Louis Co. and Missouri and created by Phillip Michaels of Missourians for Honest Elections.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hCyVsUir8k  Another Example of the 1 Minute E Voting Machine Hack

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4aKOhbbK9E  Proven voting fraud! Gov’t programmer testifies voting machines are rigging elections

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vclCSczJIvY  Democracy at risk: Voting machines might be hacked (including optiscan systems)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx5YyiyWOH4  Rigged Voting Machines

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EL9dXwBlpSs  Obama is Rigging the Electronic Voting Machines (St Louis vote-switching highlighted–Gary Fuhr)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r16LLDoWwhU  Hacking Democracy An Indepth Analysis of ES&S Voting Systems (Part 2 of 7) (We use these machines in St Louis Co. Whole series recommended.)

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2013 in Election, Freedom

 

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The Cheney-Law

Failing KC and St. Louis schools, faux balanced budgets, MO DOT wasting millions, an SOS that won’t clear the dead from the voters roles, attack after attack on our freedoms by the MO Legislature / Federal Government…

…and our precious legislative session time is being used to argue the Cheney-Law… …about whether to let someone hunt after he accidentally kills one of his hunting mates?!?!

Focus people. Focus!

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri senators have endorsed legislation allowing the Conservation Commission to levy tougher penalties on hunters who accidentally kill someone.

The measure would let the commission impose a 10-year suspension of hunting privileges on anyone who accidently kills another person while hunting. Officials already can suspend hunting privileges for up to five years when someone is injured by a weapon in a hunting accident. Commissioners would decide whether to invoke the penalty.

Senate Majority Leader Tom Dempsey proposed the tougher penalty after the husband of a constituent was killed in a hunting accident.

Fellow Republican Sen. Jason Crowell objected. He pointed out that motorists are not barred from driving after hurting someone else in an accident.

Senator Crowell should object… …to the time that is being wasted on this measure when so many other issues are stunningly more pressing.  I’m sorry for the loss of Senator Dempsey’s constituent, but let’s not run around making new laws after every tragedy.  Accidents will happen!  They are, by definition, accidents.

We cannot legislate common sense or eternal life.

 

 
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Posted by on March 27, 2012 in Miscellaneous

 

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MO: Caucus Outcome vs. Primary Outcome

At a time when the state and country is precariously perched on the edge of economic disaster, Missouri’s Representatives and Governor absolutely wasted $7,000,000 of our tax dollars on ‘an afterthought‘ and a ‘beauty contest’.

In 2009, Missourians paid $2,378 per capita in state taxes.  Using that figure, the elected leaders in the Missouri State Government, on one February day, wasted the full year state taxpaying efforts of 2,944 Missourians.  Sad.

Yet, we are provided an opportunity this week, weekend and next weekend to rectify that situation.  252,185 Missourians voted in the Missouri Presidential Preference Primary on February 7, 2012.  Their vote is not an afterthought.  The outcome is not a fluke.  Their vote is not a beauty contest.  And, their effort is not a waste.

It is the will of the Republican voter.

To ignore that Primary vote and give the delegate win to Romney or Paul would be the real tragedy in the failure of this process.  And, I am not a Santorum apologist.

Click to go to MOGOP.org for more information...I discussed the issue with several Tea Party leaders, Conservatives, candidates, and other voters.  So, to ensure that the Primary voters’ efforts were not in vain, it is entirely reasonable that we ask our local MO GOP leaders make an effort to give caucus-goers an opportunity to provide an outcome that matches that of the February 7th vote.

To match the outcome of the Primary vote on Caucus Day, each County / Precinct would need to elect as delegates a group of individuals who would vote in the same proportions as the public did on Primary Day.  Thus, for example, in Cape Girardeau County, where there will be elected 36 delegates to the 8th Congressional District and 36 Delegates to the State Convention, the math looks like this:

2012 Votes Pct Delegates
Santorum, Rick 139,272 55.20% 19
Romney, Mitt 63,882 25.30% 9
Paul, Ron 30,647 12.20% 4
Uncommitted 9,853 3.90% 1
Perry, Rick 2,456 1.00% 0
Cain, Herman 2,306 0.90% 0
Bachmann, Michele 1,680 0.70% 0
Huntsman, Jon 1,044 0.40% 0
Johnson, Gary 536 0.20% 0
Meehan, Michael J. 356 0.10% 0
Drummond, Keith 153 0.10% 0
Total 252,185
Rounding 3

The delegate counts were rounded down in the example above, so a total of 33 were assigned to Santorum, Romney, Paul and ‘Uncommitted’.  It’s your call what to do with the 3 Delegates left over after rounding.  Maybe add one each to Santorum, Romney, and Paul; give the Uncommitted Delegate to Gingrich?  But, you get the gist of what I’m suggesting here.

So, how do we do this?  I don’t know; I’ve never been to a caucus.  But, it seems to me:

  1. Forward this post to as many Republican voters as possible.  Gauge support for this endeavor.
  2. Put on your Community Organizer shoes.
  3. Talk to your local MO GOP folks to see if they will work with you.
  4. Be prepared.  Calculate how your County / Precinct delegates need to be distributed… …paper and pen to track the delegates candidates you enlist.
  5. Arrive early.
  6. Review the rules of your local caucus. Sadly, although the rules are probably already written, they are not being disseminated in some counties until caucus day.
  7. Request an amendment to the rules to vote by ‘slate’ (if necessary).
  8. Request an amendment to the rules to bind the delegates’ first vote (if necessary).
  9. Work with other caucus-goers to build a slate that will vote in the proportions necessary to mimic the outcome of the February 7th Primary.
  10. Present your slate to the caucus leadership.
  11. Vote.

I don’t think this effort will be all that foreign to the leaders of the MO GOP.  I believe, from 2000 through 2008 they were still holding a caucus and  executing a similar process to mimic the outcome of the primary in selecting the delegates for the Republican National Convention.

At the very least, you are working with the MO GOP Leaders and Caucus-goers (some of whom would also rather be at the Dogtown Parade) to effect an outcome that mimics the will of the Missouri Republican Primary Voter.  How could that be wrong?

Now, head out for some green beer, corned beef and cabbage… …unless you already got your St. Patrick’s Day waiver.

 
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Posted by on March 15, 2012 in Election

 

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Missouri Bureaucracy To Increase Taxes On Farmers

Below, Senator Crowell brings to light yet another fiefdom in the Missouri Bureaucracy…

— The Keep-It-Complex-Stupid Tax Commission.  —

…’Eight Categories based on Land Quality blah blah blah’ and ‘Valuation Increase from $985 an Acre to $1,065 an Acre yada yada yada’.

So, just how many people does it take in this tax bureaucracy to track eight categories of land quality and valuation changes per acre?  How about we fire them from the government and hire them into the ‘real’ economy?

The Founders enacted a system by which taxation is distributed equally among the people.  THREE times the Founder’s asserted that taxation be distributed equally among the people.

The Constitution’s references to taxation:

Article I, Section 2, Clause 3:

Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers…

Article I, Section 8, Clause 1:

The Congress shall have power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises…but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States…

Article I, Section 9, Clause 4:

No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.

We suspect they felt that method of taxation was best for the States as well, and Missouri needs to follow the Founders’ lead.  The answer is a consumption tax and a Free Market system… …not a bunch of games with a taxpayer funded Missouri State Tax Commission.

Senator Crowell’s Capitol Report:

Attention Southeast Missouri Farmers

What Do YOU Think?

Agriculture is Missouri’s No. 1 industry and the backbone of our state economy. We rank second in the country for number of farms, and agricultural goods are one of our main exports. How Missouri’s farms fare is often tied, or even attributable, to how our state fares.

Agriculture is more than simply an industry in Missouri, though; it’s a way of life, a core part of our state identity.  Families have been farming Southeast Missouri for almost 300 years, and it is my hope they will be given that opportunity for centuries to come.

It is important we foster and protect agriculture in Missouri.  Farming is a volatile business, and farmers are at the mercy of the weather, a constantly shifting market and overhead costs that are rising.

Now, with a decision by the State Tax Commission, they’re facing a tax reassessment.  The State Tax Commission voted in December 2011 to raise assessment values on the most productive farms in Missouri by approving new productivity values, the evaluation of a land’s potential earnings.  Productivity values are used to calculate a farm’s property taxes, so any increase results in higher property taxes for those farmers.

Missouri farmland is split into eight categories based on land quality.  The best quality is grade one, with the worst being grade eight.  The Commission’s decision would increase productivity values on farmland grades one through four by 8 percent, or an average of 18 cents per acre.  A property that produces the most dependable crop yields would see its valuation raise from $985 an acre to $1,065 an acre.

I need you to seriously consider if this is the time to make this type of change.  What do you think?  The economy is still unstable, and production costs have steadily risen in recent years.  Farms all over Missouri continue to struggle.  Last year was particularly devastating, as severe weather flooded farmlands in parts of the state and excessive heat led to rampant drought in others.  More than 100 counties were declared disaster areas.

However, the last time the productivity values on farms were raised was 1995.  And non-farm related property taxes have raised dramatically during the same time period.  There may be a legitimate argument for adjusting these values, considering the commission evaluates them every two years but has not increased the values in 17 years.  In that time, the overall Missouri Net Farm Income has nearly doubled.  And, this value increase will only affect higher-quality land, farms that should, in theory, be doing better than others.

Two years ago the commission sought to increase the productivity values by 29 percent.  I filed a Senate Concurrent Resolution to prevent this from happening, which successfully passed, blocking the increase.  This year, Sen. Brian Munzlinger, R-Williamstown, has filed Senate Concurrent Resolution 19, a similar measure that would stop the commission from raising the values this year, 2012.  If the Senate is to block the commission’s decision, though, we must act quickly.  The Legislature must pass the resolution within 60 days to block reassessment.

I am asking for your thoughts on this issue.  It can be easy to get caught up in the swell of data and statistics surrounding an issue, so your opinions mean the most to me; I look forward to hearing from you.

Contact Me

As always, I appreciate hearing your comments, opinions, and concerns.  Please feel free to contact me in Jefferson City at (573) 751-2459.  You may write to me at Jason Crowell; Missouri Senate; State Capitol; Jefferson City, MO  65101, or email me at: jcrowell@senate.mo.gov or visit me on the web at http://www.senate.mo.gov/crowell.

Certainly, we don’t want to raise taxes at a time when Missouri’s economy is so fragile, so Senator Crowell and the Missouri Tax Commission should hear a resounding, ‘NO!’

But, let’s also ask Senator Crowell and his fellow legislators to fight at the root of the problem.  Stand up and stop the tax gimmicks.  Rid us of the corrupt Income and Property Tax system in favor of a tax on consumption… …equally distributed among the people.

THAT is social justice.

Then, we won’t need someone sitting in some cubicle calculating categories and productivity values.  If the land is good, it will grow more; it will sell more; it will be taxed more.

If you need a better reason to vote for the Missouri Taxpayer Releief Act, you won’t find one.

 
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Posted by on February 7, 2012 in Free Market, Taxes

 

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